Tennis Winners



All The Champions of Tennis Tournament's


Grand Slams Winners


Grand Slam tournaments in modern tennis are the four largest annual tournaments (in order during the season):
Australian Open,French Open,Wimbledon Tournament,U.S. Open.
The term "Grand Slam" is borrowed from the card game of bridge. Winning a Grand Slam, that is, winning all four tournaments in one season, is practically the highest goal for tennis players, second only to the Golden Slam-that is, Olympic gold plus the Grand Slam.


Australian Open

Australian Open

Roland Garros

Roland Garros

Wimbledon

Wimbledon

US Open

US Open




ATP 1000 Winners


The ATP Tour Masters 1000 is a series of nine tennis tournaments held by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) throughout the year around the world.
The category is the second most prestigious in men's tennis after the Grand Slam tournaments.
The series was introduced in 1990 with the creation of the ATP Tour. Its original name was the Championship Series, Single Week. Then, from 1996 to 1999 - Mercedes-Benz ATP Super 9; from 2000 to 2003 - Tennis Masters Series; from 2004 to 2008 - ATP Masters Series, in 2009-2018 - ATP World Tour Masters 1000.
For winning a tournament in this series, a tennis player receives 1,000 ranking points. This fact is reflected in the name of the category as well.
The most titled athletes at ATP Masters 1000 series tournaments are Novak Djokovic (36 wins), Rafael Nadal (35) and Roger Federer (28).
Novak Djokovic became the first player to win all 9 Masters Series singles tournaments


Indian Wells

Indian Wells

Miami

Miami

Monte-Carlo

Monte-Carlo

Rome

Rome

Madrid

Madrid

Canada

Canada

Cincinnati

Cincinnati

Shanghai

Shanghai

Paris

Paris




ATP 500 Winners


The ATP 500 is a series of professional tennis tournaments organized by the ATP. It includes 13 tournaments and earns the winner 500 ranking points in the standings.
Previously, the tournament series was called:
1990-1999 - ATP Championship Series.
2000-2008 - ATP International Series Gold
2009-2018 - ATP World Tour 500


Rotterdam

Rotterdam

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro

Acapulco

Acapulco

Dubai

Dubai

Barcelona

Barcelona

Halle

Halle

Queens

Queens

Hamburg

Hamburg

Washington

Washington

Beijing

Beijing

Tokyo

Tokyo

St.Petersburg

St.Petersburg

Vienna

Vienna

Basel

Basel




ATP 250 Winners


The ATP Tour 250 is a category of professional tennis tournaments organized by the ATP. This category in 2020 includes 39 tournaments, winning any of which earns a tennis player 250 points in the ATP ranking.
Previously, the series was called:
1990-1999 - ATP World Series.
2000-2008 - ATP International Series
2009-2018 - ATP World Tour 250


Doha

Doha

Brisbane

Brisbane

Pune

Pune

Auckland

Auckland

Sydney

Sydney

Cordoba

Cordoba

Sofia

Sofia

Montpellier

Montpellier

New York

New York

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Marsella

Marsella

Delray Beach

Delray Beach

Sao Paulo

Sao Paulo

Houston

Houston

Marrakesh

Marrakesh

Budapest

Budapest

Munich

Munich

Estoril

Estoril

Geneva

Geneva

Lyon

Lyon

Stuttgart

Stuttgart

s.hertogenbosch

s.hertogenbosch

Antalya

Antalya

Eastbourne

Eastbourne

Newport

Newport

Umag

Umag

Bastad

Bastad

Atlanta

Atlanta

Gstaad

Gstaad

Los Cabos

Los Cabos

kitzbuhel

Kitzbuhel

Winston-Salem

Winston-Salem

Metz

Metz

Chengdu

Chengdu

Zhuhai

Zhuhai

Moscow

Moscow

Antwerp

Antwerp

Stockholm

Stockholm


ATP WorldTour Finals


ATP WorldTour Finals

ATP WorldTour Finals




Davis Cup


Davis Cup

Davis Cup


Olympics


Olympics

Olympics




Hopman Cup


Hopman Cup

Hopman Cup




Tennis


Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to maneuver the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will. The rules of modern tennis have changed little since the 1890s. Two exceptions are that from 1908 to 1961 the server had to keep one foot on the ground at all times, and the adoption of the tiebreak in the 1970s. A recent addition to professional tennis has been the adoption of electronic review technology coupled with a point-challenge system, which allows a player to contest the line call of a point, a system known as Hawk-Eye. Tennis is played by millions of recreational players and is also a popular worldwide spectator sport. The four Grand Slam tournaments (also referred to as the Majors) are especially popular: the Australian Open played on hard courts, the French Open played on red clay courts, Wimbledon played on grass courts, and the US Open also played on hard courts.


History


The game that most people call 'tennis' is the direct descendant of what is now known as real tennis or royal tennis (which continues to be played today as a separate sport with more complex rules). Most rules of the game commonly known as tennis derive from it. It is reasonable to see both sports as variations of the same game. The idea that tennis originated in the monastic cloisters in northern France in the 12th century has been largely discredited, but it is correct that in the first few centuries in which it was played, the ball was then struck with the palm of the hand; hence, the name jeu de paume ("game of the palm"). It was not until the 16th century that rackets came into use, and the game began to be called "tennis." It was popular in England and France, and Henry VIII of England was a big fan of the game, now referred to as real tennis. Many original tennis courts remain, including courts at Oxford, Cambridge, Falkland Palace in Fife where Mary Queen of Scots regularly played, and Hampton Court Palace. Many of the French courts were decommissioned with the terror that accompanied the French Revolution. The Tennis Court Oath (Serment du Jeu de Paume) was a pivotal event during the first days of the French Revolution. The Oath was a pledge signed by 576 of the 577 members from the Third Estate who were locked out of a meeting of the Estates-General on 20 June 1789. Any history of tennis that ignores its origins in the game that was (and is still in certain circles) known as tennis until "lawn tennis" became popular in the late nineteenth century is inaccurate. The Davis Cup, an annual competition between men's national teams, dates to 1900. The analogous competition for women's national teams, the Fed Cup, was founded as the Federation Cup in 1963 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the International Tennis Federation, also known as the ITF. Promoter C. C. Pyle created the first professional tennis tour in 1926, with a group of American and French tennis players playing exhibition matches to paying audiences. The most notable of these early professionals were the American Vinnie Richards and the Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen. Once a player turned pro he or she could not compete in the major (amateur) tournaments. In 1968, commercial pressures and rumors of some amateurs taking money under the table led to the abandonment of this distinction, inaugurating the Open Era, in which all players could compete in all tournaments, and top players were able to make their living from tennis. With the beginning of the open era, the establishment of an international professional tennis circuit, and revenues from the sale of television rights, tennis's popularity has spread worldwide, and the sport has shed its upper/middle-class English-speaking image.





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