Rome Winners


The Rome Masters is a tennis tournament held annually in Rome, Italy. It takes place in late April or early May in separate weeks, using clay courts. The tournament was originally known as the Italian Open. Its official name is the Internazionali BNL d'Italia tournament. This event belongs to the ATP Masters 1000.


Italy icon
surface image

Clay Court


masters 1000 image


Official Website

All Rome Champions


Year Champion Runner-up Score
1969 Australia icon John Newcombe Australia icon Tony Roche 6–3 4–6 6–2 5–7 6–3
1970 Romania icon Ilie Năstase Czech Republic icon Jan Kodeš 6–3 1–6 6–3 8–6
1971 Australia icon Rod Laver (2) Czech Republic icon Jan Kodeš 7–5 6–3 6–3
1972 Spain icon Manuel Orantes Czech Republic icon Jan Kodeš 4–6 6–1 7–5 6–2
1973 Romania icon Ilie Năstase (2) Spain icon Manuel Orantes 6–1 6–1 6–1
1974 Sweden icon Björn Borg Romania icon Ilie Năstase 6–3 6–4 6–2
1975 Mexico icon Raúl Ramírez Spain icon Manuel Orantes 7–6 7–5 7–5
1976 Italy icon Adriano Panatta Argentina  icon Guillermo Vilas 2–6 7–6 6–2 7–6
1977 United States icon Vitas Gerulaitis Italy icon Antonio Zugarelli 6–2 7–6 3–6 7–6
1978 Sweden icon Björn Borg (2) Italy icon Adriano Panatta 1–6 6–3 6–1 4–6 6–3
1979 United States icon Vitas Gerulaitis (2) Argentina  icon Guillermo Vilas 6–7 7–6 6–7 6–4 6–2
1980 Argentina  icon Guillermo Vilas France icon Yannick Noah 6–0 6–4 6–4
1981 Argentina  icon José Luis Clerc Paraguay icon Víctor Pecci 6–3 6–4 6–0
1982 Ecuador icon Andrés Gómez United States icon Eliot Teltscher 6–2 6–3 6–2
1983 United States icon Jimmy Arias Spain icon José Higueras 6–2 6–7 6–1 6–4
1984 Ecuador icon Andrés Gómez (2) United States icon Aaron Krickstein 2–6 6–1 6–2 6–2
1985 France icon Yannick Noah Czech Republic icon Miloslav Mečíř 6–3 3–6 6–2 7–6
1986 Czech Republic icon Ivan Lendl Spain icon Emilio Sánchez 7–5 4–6 6–1 6–1
1987 Sweden icon Mats Wilander Argentina  icon Martín Jaite 6–3 6–4 6–4
1988 Czech Republic icon Ivan Lendl (2) Argentina  icon Guillermo Pérez Roldán 2–6 6–4 6–2 4–6 6–4
1989 Argentina  icon Alberto Mancini United States icon Andre Agassi 6–3 4–6 2–6 7–6 6–1
1990 Austria icon Thomas Muster Soviet Union icon Andrei Chesnokov 6–1 6–3 6–1
1991 Spain icon Emilio Sánchez Argentina  icon Alberto Mancini 6–3 6–1 3–0 (ret.)
1992 United States icon Jim Courier Spain icon Carlos Costa 7–6 6–0 6–4
1993 United States icon Jim Courier (2) Croatia icon Goran Ivanišević 6–1 6–2 6–2
1994 United States icon Pete Sampras Germany icon Boris Becker 6–1 6–2 6–2
1995 Austria icon Thomas Muster (2) Spain icon Sergi Bruguera 3–6 7–6(7–5) 6–2 6–3
1996 Austria icon Thomas Muster (3) Netherlands  icon Richard Krajicek 6–2 6–4 3–6 6–3
1997 Spain icon Àlex Corretja Chile icon Marcelo Ríos 7–5 7–5 6–3
1998 Chile icon Marcelo Ríos Spain icon Albert Costa (walkover)
1999 Brazil icon Gustavo Kuerten Australia icon Patrick Rafter 6–4 7–5 7–6(8–6)
2000 Sweden icon Magnus Norman Brazil icon Gustavo Kuerten 6–3 4–6 6–4 6–4
2001 Spain icon Juan Carlos Ferrero Brazil icon Gustavo Kuerten 3–6 6–1 2–6 6–4 6–2
2002 United States icon Andre Agassi Germany icon Tommy Haas 6–3 6–3 6–0
2003 Spain icon Félix Mantilla Switzerland  icon Roger Federer 7–5 6–2 7–6(10–8)
2004 Spain icon Carlos Moyà Argentina  icon David Nalbandian 6–3 6–3 6–1
2005 Spain icon Rafael Nadal Argentina  icon Guillermo Coria 6–4 3–6 6–3 4–6 7–6(8–6)
2006 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (2) Switzerland  icon Roger Federer 6–7(0–7) 7–6(7–5) 6–4 2–6 7–6(7–5)
2007 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (3) Chile icon Fernando González 6–2 6–2
2008 Serbia icon Novak Djokovic Switzerland  icon Stan Wawrinka 4–6 6–3 6–3
2009 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (4) Serbia icon Novak Djokovic 7–6(7–2) 6–2
2010 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (5) Spain icon David Ferrer 7–5 6–2
2011 Serbia icon Novak Djokovic (2) Spain icon Rafael Nadal 6–4 6–4
2012 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (6) Serbia icon Novak Djokovic 7–5 6–3
2013 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (7) Switzerland  icon Roger Federer 6–1 6–3
2014 Serbia icon Novak Djokovic (3) Spain icon Rafael Nadal 4–6 6–3 6–3
2015 Serbia icon Novak Djokovic (4) Switzerland  icon Roger Federer 6–4 6–3
2016 Great Britain icon Andy Murray Serbia icon Novak Djokovic 6–3 6–3
2017 Germany icon Alexander Zverev Serbia icon Novak Djokovic 6–4 6–3
2018 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (8) Germany icon Alexander Zverev 6–1 1–6 6–3
2019 Spain icon Rafael Nadal (9) Serbia icon Novak Djokovic 6–0 4–6 6–1
2020 Serbia icon Novak Djokovic (5) Argentina  icon Diego Schwartzman 7–5 6–3

General Information


The men's event is part of the ATP Masters 1000 series and the women's event is part of the WTA Premiere 5 series. Both tournaments (men's and women's) are held in May. Athletes play on red clay.

The tournament was first held in 1930 in Milan and continued to be played there until 1934 when it was decided that the competition would move to Rome. From 1936 to 1949 the tournament was not held, it was resumed in 1950, and in 1969, with the beginning of the Open Era, it received the status of "Open".

In 1979 the women's tournament was held in Taranto, and from 1980 to 1986 in Perugia. These were the years of the greatest decline of the tournament: the Olympic stadium "Foro Italico", where it was held, gradually deteriorated, and the leading players of both sexes preferred to spend that part of the season in exhibition meetings and in tournaments that guaranteed extra payments for the mere fact of participation.
The image of the championship was not helped by the world-famous bias of the Italian linesmen. Tennis journalist John Feinstein writes that at the 1976 tournament they so openly mocked the local favourite Nicola Pietrangeli in every match that one of the chair umpires even refused to continue the match, and in the early 1980s, Pietrangeli, who was finishing his career, participated personally in the toss behind closed doors, choosing easier opponents in the first round. For the entire 1983 championship, it was attended by 19,000 spectators, most of them with free tickets. The restoration of the Italian Open's image began after the management giant IMG bought the rights to it in 1982.
The new tournament director, Cino Marchesa, began the process by getting large corporations to renovate the stadium (where, in particular, the number of courts was increased from six to eight and new, more spacious grandstands were built) and the adjacent residential complex, and then offered the top players improved pay conditions. The issue of bringing the women's championship back to Rome was then resolved: since the organizers of the tournament in Perugia did not agree to cede the rights to it to the Marchesa, in return IMG purchased the women's franchise in Florida and transferred the rights to it to Rome with the condition that the women's tournament would not be held simultaneously with the men's, but in the preceding week. To ensure early attendance at the women's championships, Marchese combined season tickets for the men's and women's tournaments, allowing customers to purchase both for 120 percent of the price of one. The women's portion of the tournament finally regained popularity after the beautiful semifinals (Navratilova-Sabatini) and the 1987 final.

In addition to the traditional women's and men's singles and doubles tournaments, the amateur era of the tournament also featured mixed doubles competitions.

Some tennis fans believe that the Italian tournament is the second most prestigious ground-surface tournament after the French Open.






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