Cities in EuropeCities in Austria – Vienna City

collage of vienna city
source: wikimedia commons

Vienna city, located in northeastern Austria, the capital and biggest city of the nation, coextensive with Vienna (Wien) Province. Vienna is situated on the two banks of the Danube River, with the lower regions of the Eastern Alps on the west and the fields of the Danube bowl on the east. The city lies around 203 m (666 ft) above ocean level and has a mainland atmosphere, with a mean yearly temperature of 10° C (50° F) and a normal yearly precipitation of 610 mm (24 in). Vienna was for a long time the political and financial focal point of the Austrian Empire under the Habsburg family, and somewhere in the range of 1867 and 1918 the capital of the Austro-Hungarian government.

image of vienna city
source: po.al

Following World War I (1914-1918), with Austria significantly diminished in size, the city wound up with an abruptly restricted job and its significance declined. Toward the finish of World War II (1939-1945), Vienna was vigorously harmed, however after the marking of the State Treaty in 1955, ensuring lack of bias for Austria, it again continued significant significance as a business and transportation focus.

Vienna is an important port on the Danube. Because of its strategic location on Europe’s major river, at the lowland passage between the Alps and the Carpathian Mountains, Vienna has been an important communications hub since the first Celtic settlement was established on the site. The city is by far Austria’s most important manufacturing, banking, and insurance center. Vienna contributes roughly one-fifth of Austria’s total industrial plant.

image of vienna city
source: austria.info

Among the more important structures in the city of Vienna are the town hall (Rathaus, 1872-1883), the Burgtheater (1874-1888), the University (1873-1883), the Parliament (1883), and the State Opera (1861-1869), which was burned in 1945 and rebuilt in 1955. Also here is the Hofburg, the former imperial palace, the oldest part of which was built during the 13th century. The Gothic Saint Stephen’s Cathedral (rebuilt 13th-15th century) in the center of the Inner City has a 113-m (370-ft) steeple that can be seen from all parts of Vienna. The greatest period of building in the city was between 1870 and 1890, which was also the period of the most rapid population growth.

Vienna has for quite some time been known for its social and instructive organizations. During the eighteenth, nineteenth, and mid twentieth hundreds of years, it was the melodic capital of the world, the home of numerous well known arrangers and artists, including Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Johannes Brahms, Franz Schubert, Anton Bruckner, Gustav Mahler, and Alban Berg.

image of vienna city
source: britannica.com