Cities in EuropeCities in North Macedonia – Skopje

collage of skopje city
source: wikimedia commons

Skopje, likewise Skoplje, capital city of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, in the north focal piece of the nation, on the Vardar (Axiós) River. Skopje is a market place for the tobacco, cotton, and grain developed in the encompassing area. Enterprises incorporate the production of hardware, synthetic concoctions, bond, floor coverings, earthenware, and prepared nourishment. The city is home to the University of Skopje (1949).

image of skopje city
source: wikimedia commons

Skopje dates in any event from Roman occasions, when the town was known as Scupi. Starting in the fourth century it filled in as the capital of the Roman area of Dardania. It was later incorporated into the Byzantine Empire and the Bulgarian kingdoms. The city changed hands among Serbia and the Byzantine Empire as the two forces competed for territorial control between the eleventh and thirteenth hundreds of years. The Serbs in the end won, and Skopje turned into a wellspring of Serbian culture. The Serbs lost the city to the Ottoman Turks in 1392. Throughout the following five centuries the city formed into one of the significant business focuses of the Ottoman Empire. A rail line interfacing Belgrade and Greece was worked through Skopje during the 1800s, and Skopje turned out to be much increasingly vital as an exchange center point. The Ottomans kept up control of Skopje until 1913, when the Balkan Wars left the city in the hands of Serbia. After World War I (1914-1918) Skopje turned out to be a piece of the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (renamed Yugoslavia in 1929).

image of skopje city
source: wikimedia commons

At the point when the Yugoslav republic of Macedonia was made in 1945, Skopje was made its capital. Yugoslavia’s Communist rulers put resources into the city’s improvement, however its financial development, alongside that of Yugoslav Macedonia, lingered behind that of the other recently made republics that made up Yugoslavia. In 1963 a gigantic seismic tremor struck Skopje, slaughtering in excess of 1,000 occupants and diminishing a large portion of the city to rubble. Miraculously, a few structures dating from the Ottoman days endure the tremor. Among these strong structures are the domed Daut Pasha Hammam—one of the biggest Turkish bathhouses in the Balkans—and an elegant stone scaffold spreading over the Vardar.

In 1991 Yugoslav Macedonia turned into a free country. Skopje was assigned its capital.